s a d i e

a little piece of white cloth and oil.

FELICE CASORATI (1883-1963) 

"In taking up, against me, the old polemic of classicism and romanticism, people rail against intellectualized and scholastic order, accuse my art of being insincere, and wilfully academic—in a word, of being neoclassical. … since my art is born, so to speak, from within, and never has its source in changing "impressions", it is quite natural that … static forms, and not the fluid images of passion, should be reflected in my works." (1931)

JERRY   /   MATISSE   /   MOMA
"…despite all this visual firepower and radical experimentation, many persist in dismissing Matisse as a painter interested only in prettiness and making art "a comfortable armchair." The unspoken charge is that "He’s not as powerful as Picasso." Or macho. Just last month, an Artforum writer decried The Cut-Outsas “sensuous distraction.” This has been a party line since 1908, when Gertrude Stein recorded that “the feeling between the Picasso-ites and the Matisse-ites became bitter.” In 1925, “Picassoite” Jean Cocteau wrote that Matisse painting in the sun-drenched South of France had “turned into one of Bonnard’s kittens.” This prejudice goes beyond the need for heroes and powerful male figures; it comes from the fear of art being too beautiful, girly, gay-looking, ornamental, or decorative, and can be traced back to the proscriptions against pleasure, sensuality, and sex in Judeo-Christian tradition. Similar arguments were used against geniuses like Boucher and Fragonard and all of the Rococo, which was seen as too feminine and frilly to be taken seriously. Interestingly, these proscriptions never existed in Asia, Oceania, or Africa. It has never been explained why pure beauty, form, color, comfort, or even kittens are any less visceral than a picture of a bull with a naked lady being raped in the background. Part of what makes The Cut-Outs feel especially electric today is that few artists buy the old bogus arguments.” 

JERRY   /   MATISSE   /   MOMA

"…despite all this visual firepower and radical experimentation, many persist in dismissing Matisse as a painter interested only in prettiness and making art "a comfortable armchair." The unspoken charge is that "He’s not as powerful as Picasso." Or macho. Just last month, an Artforum writer decried The Cut-Outsas “sensuous distraction.” This has been a party line since 1908, when Gertrude Stein recorded that “the feeling between the Picasso-ites and the Matisse-ites became bitter.” In 1925, “Picassoite” Jean Cocteau wrote that Matisse painting in the sun-drenched South of France had “turned into one of Bonnard’s kittens.” This prejudice goes beyond the need for heroes and powerful male figures; it comes from the fear of art being too beautiful, girly, gay-looking, ornamental, or decorative, and can be traced back to the proscriptions against pleasure, sensuality, and sex in Judeo-Christian tradition. Similar arguments were used against geniuses like Boucher and Fragonard and all of the Rococo, which was seen as too feminine and frilly to be taken seriously. Interestingly, these proscriptions never existed in Asia, Oceania, or Africa. It has never been explained why pure beauty, form, color, comfort, or even kittens are any less visceral than a picture of a bull with a naked lady being raped in the background. Part of what makes The Cut-Outs feel especially electric today is that few artists buy the old bogus arguments.” 

reckoning / oil on wood / 22” x 30” / 2014
When a man’s verses cannot be understood, nor aman’s good wit seconded with the forward childUnderstanding, it strikes a man more dead than agreat reckoning in a little room. Truly, I wouldthe gods had made thee poetical.

reckoning / oil on wood / 22” x 30” / 2014

When a man’s verses cannot be understood, nor a
man’s good wit seconded with the forward child
Understanding, it strikes a man more dead than a
great reckoning in a little room. Truly, I would
the gods had made thee poetical.

Kin’youbi (water-damaged photographs from Fukushima)
8” x 10”
oil on wood
2014
www.sadiestarnes.com

Kin’youbi (water-damaged photographs from Fukushima)

8” x 10”

oil on wood

2014

www.sadiestarnes.com